Mini-Splits vs. Garage Heaters: Whats Ideal for My Woodshop?

Comfortable isn’t usually a word used to reference a garage. But many homeowners make the most of this area as a workshop for home improvement projects or pastimes like woodworking. Considering transforming your garage into a home woodshop? By adding heating and cooling, you’ll have the ability to use the area year-round.

Standard systems, like a furnace, heat pump or air conditioner, are typically cost-prohibitive because of the ductwork that’s necessary. Not to mention, garages are frequently not connected to your home.

The two most popular styles are garage heaters or mini-split systems, since they don’t need ductwork. But which kind should you choose? It’s essential to be aware of each to find the most energy-efficient solution for your situation. Sawdust needs extra thought because these particles can bog down filters and decrease your system’s efficiency.

We go over the differences to help you select the right solution for your shop.

Mini-Splits: Top Marks for Heating and Cooling

Ductless mini-splits are like a heat pump, since they shift heat instead of creating it. This makes them extremely energy efficient. They’re placed on your wall and connect to an exterior unit via a small hole in the wall.

A mini-split air conditioner is popular for its energy efficiency and nearly silent operation. This makes it good for craftsmen searching for a tranquil, cozy space to work. Because they provide both heating and cooling, mini-splits can be used throughout the year.

Since wood expands with shifts in temperature, complete control over heating and cooling is highly beneficial. Many carpenters and woodworkers recommend completing work in temperatures similar to where the completed creation will end up.

Changing your filter often is a critical component of maintenance. Cutting creates a lot of sawdust. If you don’t keep up with your mini-split’s filter, you might lower your system’s efficiency and longevity.

A mini-split also requires regular tune-ups from a experienced HVAC tech, like one from Stevenson Service Experts. Keeping its internal components clean and lubricated will help decrease the likelihood of interruptions in comfort and may even help it work for a greater period of time.

Garage Heaters: Great for Northern Climates

Garage heaters work slightly differently. They create heat, so it’s ideal to compare one to a miniature furnace. They’re installed on the ceiling, often in a corner. If you need your garage for additional storage, know that these heaters will require a portion the overhead area.

The main difference between garage heaters and mini-split systems is the kind of fuel they use, because mini-splits are electric. Propane or natural gas garage heaters are both standard models, but there are electric garage heaters too if you don’t want to add fuel connections.

Garage heaters include a plus that makes them slightly better than a mini-split system. They don’t have to have a filter and some models have separate combustion chambers, which stops sawdust from getting into those internal components.

Key Differences Between Mini-Splits and Garage Heaters

In the end there are a lot of things to think over, such as the weather in Dayton. These include:

  • Whether you want both heating and cooling, or just heating.
  • Your budget.
  • How much wall area you have in your shop.
  • How much time and money you want to devote to service.

Ductless mini-split systems are great if you value versatility and prime energy efficiency. They give both heating and cooling, making them the smartest solution for zoned climate control. But this efficiency comes at a price. Mini-split heat pumps cost more up front than garage heaters. If you don’t plan on using your woodshop all the time, this may not be the most cost-effective option. But woodshops in areas with major shifts in temps may benefit from more precise control.

Garage heaters are a simpler, budget-friendly solution. Different models use different fuel sources to generate heat only, making them ill-suited for warm areas. Gas or propane garage heaters are ideal if fuel costs are low. They’re not as energy efficient, so frequent use may create higher utility bills. But the excellent heat generation is recommended in colder areas.

For knowledgeable advice and installation, turn to the HVAC Experts at Stevenson Service Experts. We’ll help you make the right choice. And with quality repair and maintenance services, your shop will be a productive space for many years to come. Contact us at 937-503-7896 to schedule a free home comfort assessment or appointment today.

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